Tag Archives: mythology

long (or strong) arm

    MEANING   far-reaching power or influence     ORIGIN   The earlier expression long hands was originally after classical Latin an nescis longas regibus esse manus?, used by the Roman poet Ovid (43 BC – circa 17 AD) in the epistolary poems Epistulæ Heroidum, (Letters of Heroines). While her husband, King Menelaus, is away, Helen […]

Continue Reading

Atlantic

    The adjective Atlantic originally referred to Mount Atlas*, on which the heavens were fabled to rest. It was hence applied to the sea near the western shore of Africa, and afterwards extended to the whole ocean lying between Europe and Africa on the east and America on the west. * The Atlas Mountains […]

Continue Reading

this mortal coil

    MEANING   the troubles and activities of this mortal life     ORIGIN   In A Dictionary of the English Language (1755), the English lexicographer Samuel Johnson (1709-84) thus defined the noun coil: Tumult; turmoil; bustle; stir; hurry; confusion. This obsolete noun is probably from Old French acueil (Modern French accueil), meaning reception, encounter. […]

Continue Reading
psychopomp

psychopomp

  Charon and Psyche (circa 1883), by John Roddam Spencer Stanhope (1829-1908)       MEANING   the spiritual guide of a living person’s soul     ORIGIN   The noun psychopomp, also psychopompos, is from ancient Greek ψυχοπομπός (= psukhopompos), meaning conductor, or guide, of souls. This Greek noun is from ψυχή (= pshukhe), soul, […]

Continue Reading
bugbear

bugbear

  a lamia, from The History of Four-footed Beasts and Serpents (1658) (A lamia was a fabulous monster supposed to have the body of a woman, and to prey upon human beings and suck the blood of children.)       MEANING   a cause of obsessive fear, anxiety or irritation     ORIGIN   […]

Continue Reading
Sciapodes

Sciapodes

  a sciapod, from the Hereford Mappa Mundi (circa 1300)       The Sciapodes (or Monopods) were a mythical race of people supposed to have lived at the southern edge of the ancient Greek and Roman world, who each had a single leg ending in a foot of immense size with which they shaded […]

Continue Reading
facilis descensus Averno

facilis descensus Averno

  Aeneas and the Sibyl, Lake Avernus (circa 1798), by Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851) – image: Tate       MEANING   It is easy to slip into evil or immoral ways.     ORIGIN   Lake Avernus (in Italian Lago Averno) is a crater lake in Campania, southern Italy, near Cumae and Puteoli, […]

Continue Reading
ignis fatuus

ignis fatuus

  Henry Buttes       The Latin ignis fatuus (plural ignes fatui), meaning foolish fire, seems to have first appeared in an English text in the mid-16th century and denotes a phosphorescent light seen hovering or floating at night on marshy ground, thought to result from the combustion of natural gases. The common name […]

Continue Reading
nightmare

nightmare

  Johann Heinrich Füssli (1741-1825) – Der Nachtmahr (1790)       The noun mare, which appeared in early Old English, denoted a spirit believed to produce a feeling of suffocation in a sleeping person or animal, hence also a feeling of suffocation experienced during sleep, and an oppressive or terrifying dream. Unrelated to mare in […]

Continue Reading
dog in the manger

dog in the manger

  The Dog in the Manger, from The Fables of Æsop selected, told anew and their history traced (1894), by Joseph Jacobs – illustrated by Richard Heighway       MEANING   A person who prevents others from having or using things even though he or she does not need them     ORIGIN   […]

Continue Reading
123

Unblog.fr | Créer un blog | Annuaire | Signaler un abus