Tag Archives: drinks
cock-a-hoop

cock-a-hoop

  cock-throwing in The Four Stages of Cruelty: First Stage of Cruelty (1751) by William Hogarth (1697-1764) - image: Tate Galleries       MEANING   extremely and obviously pleased, especially about an achievement     ORIGIN: UNKNOWN   This adjective is from the 16th-century phrase to set cock a hoop, to set (the) cock on (the) hoop, […]

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Bloody Mary

Bloody Mary

  Advertisement in the magazine Life – 17th March 1961 The Bloody María (anything vodka can do, Ronrico Rum can do better) The difference between a Bloody Mary and a Bloody María is the difference between Mary and María. María is Mary set to music. A Bloody María is easy to make. Simply use Ronrico […]

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Scotch mist

Scotch mist

  Scotch mist over the path in Bealach Dubh beneath Sgòr Iutharn photograph: John Lucas – geograph       Scotch mist is a thick drizzly mist of a kind common in the Scottish Highlands. The term also has the general meaning of a steady drizzle. It was defined as “a sober, soaking Rain” in […]

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muggins

muggins

  a Toby jug by Ralph Wood the Younger (1748-95) photograph: Victoria and Albert Museum     MEANING   A muggins is a foolish and gullible person. The word is often used humorously to refer to oneself.     ORIGIN   In colloquial usage since the mid-19th century, this word is perhaps a use of […]

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‘rum’

‘rum’

  Captain Roberts’ Crew carousing at Old Calabar River from The Pirates Own Book (1837) by Charles Ellms       The noun rum, denoting an alcoholic spirit distilled from molasses and other sugar-cane products, is first attested in 1654 in Public Records of the Colony of Connecticut: Berbados Liquors, commonly called Rum, Kill Deuill […]

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brandy

brandy

  The Grand Master; or, Adventures of Qui Hi? in Hindostan. A Hudibrastic Poem in Eight Cantos by Quiz (1816) – illustration by Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827) (photograph: Julie L. Mellby – Princeton University Library)       The noun brandy appeared around 1640. Its original forms were brandwine and brandewine, from Dutch brandewijn, burnt (= […]

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‘gin’

‘gin’

  Gin Lane (1751) by William Hogarth     The Latin noun juniperus is the origin of the English juniper and of the Old French genevre (modern French genièvre), which was adopted in Middle Dutch as genever (modern Dutch jenever). In the early 17th century, this Dutch noun came to be used in the sense […]

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whisky

whisky

  A Nip against the Cold – 1869 by the Scottish painter Erskine Nicol (1825-1904)     Whisky, or whiskey, is a spirit distilled originally in Ireland and Scotland, and still chiefly in the British Isles, from malted barley with or without unmalted barley or other cereals, in the USA chiefly from maize or rye. […]

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sherry

sherry

  Falstaff mit Handschuhen, Zinnkanne und Weinglas (Falstaff with gloves, pewter jug and wine glass – 1919) by Eduard von Grützner     The word sherry is an alteration of the obsolete sherris, also spelt sherries, which was mistaken for a plural. The original word was a rendering of Spanish (vino de) Xeres, (wine of) […]

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mustard

mustard

  black mustard seeds – photograph: Sanjay Acharya     The English word mustard is from Anglo-Norman and Old French forms such as mustarde and moustarde, meaning a condiment prepared with crushed mustard grains. These words are composed of most, meaning must (grape juice before or during fermentation) and the suffix -ard. This condiment was […]

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